Monthly Archives: August 2007

Software Testing 3.0: Delivering on the Promise of Software Testing

By Hung Q. Nguyen and Rob Pirozzi, LogiGear Corporation

This is an adaptation of a presentation entitled Software Testing 3.0 given by Hung Nguyen, LogiGear CEO, President, and Founder. The presentation was given as the keynote at the Spring 2007 STPCON conference in San Mateo, California.

Watch for an upcoming whitepaper based on this topic.

Introduction

This first article of this two article series (The Early Evolution of Software Testing), discussed the early phases of software testing (Software Testing 1.0 and 2.0). It highlighted how both of these phases have largely underperformed expectations and discussed the shortcomings of these early phases of software testing.

Software Testing 3.0: Case Study #2

Introduction

Software Testing 3.0 is a strategic end-to-end framework for change based upon a strategy to drive testing activities, tool selection, and people development that finally delivers on the promise of software testing. For more details on the evolution of software testing and Software Testing 3.0 see:

Also see a previous case study on Software Testing 3.0 principals in action: Software Testing 3.0: Case Study #1

Following is a second case study of Software Testing 3.0 principals in action.

Software Testing 3.0: Case Study #1

Introduction

Software Testing 3.0 is a strategic end-to-end framework for change based upon a strategy to drive testing activities, tool selection, and people development that finally delivers on the promise of software testing. For more details on the evolution of software testing and Software Testing 3.0 see:

  1. The Early Evolution of Software Testing
  2. Software Testing 3.0: Delivering on the Promise of Software Testing

Following is a case study of Software Testing 3.0 principals in action.

Testing Under Pressure – Relieving the “Crunch Zone”

By Hans Buwalda, Chief Technology Officer, LogiGear Corporation

Introduction

This article discusses the all-too-common occurrence of the time needed to perform software testing being short changed as specification, development, and unforeseen “issues” cause the phases prior to testing to expand. The result is that extreme pressure is placed upon the testing organization to perform the testing function within a reduced time frame. The article proposes five principals to help reduce the pressure on testing.